Connecticut Substitute Teaching License

connecticut

All Connecticut school districts have their own qualifications and application process for substitute teachers.

education

Education Requirements

If you hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university, you may serve as a substitute in one school district for an entire school year without needing a substitute teacher authorization. You may not serve more than 40 days at a time in any one assignment, however.

Want to learn how to earn a professional teaching certification? Contact schools offering teaching certification programs in Connecticut.

If you have a bachelor’s degree and wish to substitute for more than 40 days in one assignment, this is possible if you also have at least 12 semester hours of credit in the subject area in which you are teaching.

If you do not have a bachelor’s degree, you may be allowed to be a substitute in a district if the superintendent grants a waiver. You must still be at least 18 years old, have a high school diploma and meet experience requirements (see below).

experience

Experience

If you have a bachelor’s degree, you do not need any experience to work as a substitute teacher. If you do not have a bachelor’s degree, you will only be granted a waiver if you have experience working with school-age children and meet educational requirements above.

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Criminal History Background Check

All school employees in Connecticut must undergo a criminal history record check, including fingerprinting. This process is usually not started until you are hired by a Connecticut school district, or within the first 30 days of your employment. The school district that employs you will give you the necessary forms and direct you to the nearest fingerprinting location. A list of Connecticut fingerprinting services may be found here.

The State Police Bureau of Identification and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) will check your fingerprints. The results of your criminal history background check will be reported directly to the school district that employs you. You must submit to additional criminal background checks every three years for as long as you work for a Connecticut school district.

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Additional Information

If you do not have a bachelor’s degree, you must file Form ED174, Application for Substitute Teacher Authorization for Candidates Who Have Not Completed a Bachelor’s Degree.

If you have a bachelor’s degree and substitute for more than 40 days in one school district in the same assignment, the district must file Form ED175, Application for Extension of Substitute Teacher Authorization Beyond the 40-Day Limit.

If you already hold a Connecticut teaching certificate, you may work as a substitute teacher for an unlimited period if your certificate is appropriate to the grade level and subject you are teaching. If your certificate is not appropriate, however, the district must apply for an authorization extension for any substitute teaching assignment going beyond 40 days.

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Contact Information

Contact the Connecticut school district you are interested in subbing in and inquire about their application process and requirements.

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Terminology and Specifics

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